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2013 CMMS Benchmark Report

Posted by on Aug 16, 2013 in General | Comments Off on 2013 CMMS Benchmark Report

The Computerized Maintenance Management Software market has changed a lot since we first dipped our feet into it back in 2007. Keeping abreast of the developments is important and this is why we’re recommending you have a look at this CMMS benchmark report by SoftwareAdvice. These are a few of the takeways from the report: 1) 66% of respondents still use on-premise maintenance software vs. cloud setups. 2) 50% of maintenance software now runs on mobile devices. 3) Around 82% of respondents were either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their CMMS software 4) Furthermore around 70% said that CMMS reduces repair costs either very well or somewhat well 5) Interestingly around 62% said that their CMMS reduces downtime very well or somewhat well. In our view, compared to other software these are encouraging results though there is still a lot of room for improvement. What are your views on the...

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What is a CMMS? Why is it important?

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in General | Comments Off on What is a CMMS? Why is it important?

CMMS is an acronym for Computerized Maintenance Management System. To provide you with a functional definition, a CMMS is a software application that helps the maintenance manager run the maintenance function of a company. The purpose of the CMMS is to increase asset efficiency and reliability, while keeping the practice of maintenance as cost-effective as possible. It is important to make clear that there are various different CMMSs in the market, ranging from the simple basic database-type applications, to more complex systems with fancy features, and normally, hefty price tags. Implementing a CMMS is many times linked to developing or re-organizing the Preventive Maintenance system in your firm. Preventive Maintenance is a mentality which preaches that if machinery is serviced and repaired regularly then the probability of asset failure, and hence production downtime, is minimized. Preventive Maintenance works. To achieve it, a CMMS should at least offer: Data storage: the CMMS should store data on a number of things such as equipment, employees, suppliers and clients. Scheduling: the software should be able to schedule the work timetables of the maintenance personnel. Inventory control: a lot of time is often wasted waiting for spares. This problem should be minimized or solved completely by better organizing the management of spare parts. Reporting: summaries of existing data should be organized for reports showing past performance or predicting future result estimates. Apart from the above functionality, a CMMS can have many other features that help the maintenance department fulfil its function. Among the more popular functions are financial reporting capabilities, KPI (key performance indicator) monitoring, predictive maintenance tools, and support for mobile computing. Despite, and perhaps because of, all the above functionality, many CMMS implementations still fail. This happens for a wide range of reasons such as poor planning, lack of motivation, and lack of proper training. For this reason, it is important that when choosing a CMMS, a proper roadmap needs to be designed to show how the full capabilities of the chosen CMMS will be utilized within the maintenance department. With respect to why having a CMMS is important, another question must first be put forward. What is the best way to implement a successful preventive maintenance mentality? The answer is: get a quality CMMS. Having a CMMS which automates many tasks which would otherwise take a lot of time to do (manually) is enough reason why companies justify spending hundreds and thousands of dollars on such systems. The organization of data, management of assets, and employee resource management facilities, that having a proper CMMS gives you, are indispensable for any maintenance manager. In conclusion, it makes sense to state that despite the difficulties often encountered in implementing a CMMS, this is very much where maintenance management is heading. CMMS software has been around for over 20 years, and it looks like they are here to...

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Using CMMS to Improve and Enhance Maintenance Management

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in General | Comments Off on Using CMMS to Improve and Enhance Maintenance Management

Maintenance managers have a role in which their decision making skills, leadership, and training skills need to be at an optimum level to be effective. Maintenance department and/or facility budgets can range fromseveral thousand dollars to a million or more. The management of their departments, staff, preventive maintenance programs, and inventories needs to be within a system that has an integrated successful effect on the bottom line. A maintenance manager depending on their industry will have their own set of unique challenges and demands. The use of the Clever CMMS presents a manager with the opportunity and resources to streamline their maintenance business processes and thus improve efficiencies and reduce cost. How can a CMMS Program Provide a Manager with an Effective Pragmatic Navigational Approach to Preventive Maintenance? A CMMS can provide an organized system that can be a valuable resource to a maintenance managers and aid in an organized fashion in all aspects of a preventive maintenance curriculum. In defining management there needs to be a defined approach or system in place. The system becomes the plan and management is guiding and directing others in executing the plan. A system such as a CMMS allows the maintenance manager to direct the activities of a preventive maintenance program in a much more organized fashion thus allowing the manager the freedom to assure accountability whilst follow-through is present. A CMMS is a valued tool and resource that allows the manager to recognize the complete benefits to making his/her department a cost management entity through cost savings, and productivity gains. As an ally and a maintenance managers’ systems solution, a CMMS can aid in the management of the following: Once the CMMS learning process is completed preventive maintenance scheduling becomes a planned defined service procedure. A Work order step is scheduled on multiple dates. Each scheduled maintenance occurrence can be flexible according to the needs of the equipment. Each piece of equipment can have several PM’s with intervals ranging from one day to weekly, monthly, and annual service. The manager can use the CMMS to not only schedule PM’s, but list inspection points, time needed for each PM, and to issue instructions and descriptions of tasks required on each piece of equipment. This allows a manager to manage the PM process and track the PM’s completed and rate the PM service itself. A true performance management system that allows a manager to review his mechanics performance on a regular basis, and determine where skill sets may need more training. After input of data , the CMMS should be able to identify, and describe each piece of equipment, its components, spare parts and maintenance history. This process flow leads to a well managed control of inventory, stock location, quantity on hand, and reorder point, which creates purchasing efficiencies through the history created on each piece of equipment. Simplifying and organizing the above processes leads to less equipment downtime, increased efficiencies, and increased productivity. The functionality of the system allows the manager to clearly evaluate equipment, define skill set enhancements for the staff, and prepare downtime cost savings reports. Improvement Continuous Improvement is always in place with a CMMS system that can virtually manage all aspects of a maintenance department’s work through an integrated robust maintenance software...

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Effective Preventive Maintenance

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in Preventive Maintenance | Comments Off on Effective Preventive Maintenance

We are in a time when business decision making has to be prudent, information based, and aligned with organizational goals. This holds true in every department and category within an organizational structure, and within the key elements of cost-savings initiatives. Many organizations are now using computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) not only as a record keeping resource of preventive maintenance activity, but as an expense reduction resource. A CMMS can be very effective in the control of operating budgets for maintenance departments and it helps create a well performance-based preventive maintenance management system. A Win-Win Situation – Reducing Maintenance Cost while Increasing Productivity A CMMS provides a company’s maintenance department with the opportunity to increase overall productivity and reduce cost while positioning the department to be a cost management value to an organization. Preventive maintenance (PM) planning and measures should include an organized user-friendly manageable system. A CMMS addresses the organizing of planning, tracking, identifying maintenance “bottlenecks”, and the deliverables needed for the optimization of equipment operations and the fulfilling its projected life span. It can also be used to project planned replacement intervals for equipment before equipment failure, greatly reducing the chance of an unplanned replacement in more costly conditions. Preventive Maintenance in a CMMS environment can effectively change the value of a PM program into the reality of increased bottom line profits through the efficiencies of productivity gains and a vast improvement in equipment downtime.”Raising the Bar” through an effective CMMS creates a maintenance department that is well integrated and aligned with other organizational goals. Well implemented systems generate a healthy Return on Investment (ROI). A qualitative example could be in sales. Presenting sales staff with a record of no lost sales due to product shortage resulting from equipment failure, is an added plus to the business and the customer...

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Preventive Maintenance – A Brief Introduction

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in Preventive Maintenance | Comments Off on Preventive Maintenance – A Brief Introduction

’Preventive Maintenance’ is often a misunderstood term. It is often confused with other terms such as predictive maintenance, reliability centered maintenance, and condition monitoring. This article will set the record straight on what preventive maintenance is exactly. All around the world, a good number of maintenance departments still work with systems largely based on corrective maintenance. This basically refers to the act of repair. In other words, these maintenance departments work by simply fixing equipment whenever it breaks down. The problem with this approach is that it does not allow for a great deal of planning in the maintenance department since nobody really knows what the next work order will consist of, and when and where it will be. This information only becomes available when a failure or breakdown occurs. As a consequence, department efficiency is sacrificed leading to higher costs. Another problem with corrective maintenance is that when equipment becomes faulty, the production process is disturbed thus leading to less output from the operations department. This results in even more money loss. Preventive maintenance is a system which offers solutions to these problems. It normally involves any work that helps to prevent equipment failure and hence, helps extend asset lifetime. Many times, this type of maintenance is time-based. However, preventive maintenance need not be time-based and preventive checks can be carried out on what is referred to as subjective condition monitoring. This means that when the maintenance technicians sense that equipment requires maintenance, then this can be either scheduled for later on or be carried out immediately. Some examples of preventive maintenance jobs include checking asset alignment, balancing, lubrication, vibration and voltage. More examples include replacing parts, replacing equipment with fixed life-times, equipment cleaning, and equipment installation procedures. To help with setting up efficient preventive maintenance systems, many companies today make use of computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS). These are software applications that help maintenance departments manage their equipment and employees. For more information on CMMS, read What is a CMMS? Why is it...

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3 ways to improve Health and Safety in your Maintenance Department

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in Preventive Maintenance | Comments Off on 3 ways to improve Health and Safety in your Maintenance Department

This is the first article in a two-part series about how to improve health and safety practices in your business. The health and safety issue should be prioritised and given utmost attention, regardless of the industry. In this article we are discussing health and safety with regards to manufacturing industries. A company’s most prized asset is its workforce. Therefore, human resource planning and maintaining high quality standards, are necessary for businesses to protect the health and lives of their employee at the place of work. One of the functions of a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) is to ensure that certain standards are kept, both by the employees individually and also by the company as a whole. Companies that are serious about the safety of their employees maintain quality standards minimizing any possibility of accidents happening at the place of work. This article will be concerned with a brief discussion on creating a safe environment on the place of work. Attention will also be attributed to how CMMS software can contribute in this regard. 1. Identifying areas of danger Keeping records of past workplace incidents is important as it serves the purpose of helping notice any patterns with workplace incidents. For instance, if within the last two years, there have been three incidents with the electricity generator, resulting in a number of injuries, a thorough investigation of the situation is then necessary. The argument that the past is not always a good indicator for future decision making is very much debatable in the context of health and safety. This is completely understandable. If accidents are not catered for they will continue happening in the future, in the process jeopardizing the health of the companies’ employees. CMMS software is a useful tool that can be used to identify areas of danger. Using such systems helps you automatically keep a record of all machine breakdowns, and therefore makes it easier to avoid situations which might threaten workers’ safety. Furthermore, recent advancements in reliability centred maintenance and condition monitoring, such as vibration analysis and oil analysis, it has now become easier to monitor the quality of operation of machinery. 2. Standard operating procedures Developing Standard Operating Procedures is one of the most critical exercises for any maintenance department. Having a safety program is crucial. A safety program, for instance, ensures that every work order issued by the CMMS has instructions describing the necessary safety precautions that need to be taken to ensure that the maintenance guys can perform their duties with minimal danger necessary. These instructions should ideally be pre-established before CMMS implementation so that employees get accustomed to them. Clearly stated instructions are needed as they help reduce confusion and uncertainty, and as a result create a better workflow and productivity. For example if an accident is reported in Area B1L2C3 in a manufacturing plant, one will look for the operating procedures in practice at the time of the accident. Having the safety procedures written down also protects the company from any blame in case of injury. If it is found that an accident occurred because an employee did not follow such procedures, the firm escapes any liability provided that it provided the employee with the necessary tools needed to carry out the task safely 3. Safety priority The equipment of...

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